Mind Mapping Software Blog http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com The best mind mapping tools and strategies for business success Fri, 21 Aug 2015 14:31:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 12 ways to build a hyper-efficient work breakdown structure http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/build-an-efficient-work-breakdown-structure/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/build-an-efficient-work-breakdown-structure/#respond Thu, 20 Aug 2015 19:29:44 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8434 Mind mapping software can help teams do a more effective and comprehensive job of create a work breakdown structure (WBS) - a key project planning document that is pivotal to project success. Here are 12 ways it can supercharge project planning and execution.

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build a better work breakdown structure

In project management, the work breakdown structure (WBS) is a pivotal planning document: It divides the project into phases and displays the tasks required to complete each one. A very effective way to create a WBS is with mind mapping software, which supports all of the steps teams need to follow to plan and execute a successful project.

As you’ll see, mind mapping software can help teams do a more effective and comprehensive job of project planning, spur team involvement and creativity, and can lighten the burden in many ways for overworked project managers.

Here are 12 ways mind mapping software can supercharge creation of a work breakdown structure:

1. Creativity during the project planning process

If you haven’t managed projects before, you may be tempted to assume that project planning is a purely logical exercise. But you would be wrong. Successful project planning also needs to have a creative element, according to a paper entitled Mind Mapping as a WBS Development Tool by Karen A. Brown, Ph.D., PMP and Nancy Lea Hyer, Ph.D., published on the Project Management Institute (PMI) website (free registration is required to view the paper).

“Left-brain or linear thinking may be important for scheduling, resource allocation, and monitoring project progress. However, the early stages of a project require more creative or right-brain thinking… A mind map presents information in a visually stimulating manner and draws on the latent creativity of project team members. As a consequence, it allows a team to generate more ideas and instills involvement.”

But is creativity REALLY necessary during creation of the work breakdown structure? Isn’t linear thinking enough? The paper’s authors say yes:

“Why is creativity necessary in the early stages of project planning? First, there may be more than one way to achieve project goals.”

It’s human nature. We come up with one solution, and naturally assume it’s the best. We simply go with it. But it may be more advantageous to invest more time and consider other possible solutions – one of which may achieve the project goals faster, at a lower cost and with less risk. Mind mapping encourages whole-brained thinking – so it supports both the creative and logical sides of the mind that are needed for successful project planning and execution.

2. It drives greater involvement during the brainstorming process

project management and WBS developmentIn a team planning meeting, a mind map projected on the wall is a catalyst, spurring more ideas than conventional methods of project planning, such as whiteboards and sticky notes. According to professors Brown and Hyer, it also tends to naturally draw out quiet people, who otherwise may be intimidated to write an idea on a flipchart or whiteboard.

“The early stages of project planning call for creativity and team involvement—mind mapping provides the stimulus for both.”

A side benefit of these factors is speed. Mind mapping enables teams to generate a more comprehensive work breakdown structure, faster:

“Mind mapping is fast. When we introduce mind mapping to groups, we find that the speed of the process is often the most striking benefit that they discover. They are amazed at how little time it can take to generate a first pass at a WBS. For a project of moderate size, they can develop an initial framework and a relative amount of detail in just 20 to 30 minutes.”

3. Mind maps encourage greater consensus and “buy in”

Mind maps spur greater discussion during team planning meetings, ensuring a higher degree of “buy in” and support for the project. That’s critical, because if team members don’t feel a sense of ownership in the project, they will be unlikely to fully support it during project execution. Such passive resistance can undermine even the best-planned projects.

“Mind mapping engages the team and generates enthusiasm for the project,” the paper’s authors report. They have used it in hundreds of settings, and find it to be very effective. They also report that mind mapping also gives team members a better grasp of the bigger picture, which often gets lost as teams wade their way through the details of the project planning process. The better they understand the purpose and thinking behind the project, the more likely they are to support it.”

4. Avoid getting “lost in the weeds” too early in the planning process

Without a tool like a mind map to bring both creativity and structure to the work breakdown structure, teams can too quickly get mired in entering tasks into a GANTT chart or project management software. Preoccupied with minutiae and the tools, they may miss valuable details that need to be included in the plan. Mind mapping software, with its ability to expand and collapse topic branches, is ideal for giving teams a clear idea of the bigger picture as well as for digging down into the details.

5. More complete planning means fewer problems later

Most project managers have experienced this uncomfortable scenario: During the project planning process, a key area was overlooked. Incorporating it into the project’s current status inevitably results in delays, scope creep and cost overruns – and some unhappy stakeholders!

The visual design of a WBS mind map makes it easy to see how all of the information it contains is related. You can more easily identify what’s missing and where greater clarification or more information is needed. As a result, professional project managers agree that mind maps result in a more complete picture of people, priorities, challenges and risks.

6. Makes idea organization easier

Typically, after a team has generated a complete first draft of a WBS mind map, one or more project leaders analyze, consolidate, and organize the ideas they contain. As the paper points out, this is an analytical task that does not lend itself well to group interaction. After that, the full team reconvenes to review the results of this synthesized version of the WBS.

“The second round of group discussion about the WBS will allow for clarification and reinforce team buy-in, but it is also likely to generate additional ideas to add to the map,” the authors explain. Because of the mind map’s radial structure, new ideas are easily accommodated and integrated into its structure.

7. It facilitates risk management

As with any business plan, there is always a certain degree of uncertainty when formulating a project plan. Using the WBS mind map, the team can take steps to identify potential risks and mitigate them:

“Early in the planning project, a team should consider possible risks and build-in plans for avoiding them, mitigating their consequences, or responding to them. Once the team has gained a big picture perspective on the project through a mapping process, members can step back and ask, ‘Given the scope and content of our plan, what could go wrong?’ Very often, the group decides to modify the mind map, adding or deleting elements from the WBS, based on this analysis.”

Once again, the flexibility of the mind map format makes this fairly easy to do. The team can even perform this risk analysis in a linked sub-map, so they don’t clutter up the WBS map too much. This removes clutter from the main mind map, while still keeping the risk analysis and other supporting information just a single mouse click away.

8. Task assignments are easy

Once the work breakdown structure is complete, the team must turn its attention to identifying tasks that need to be done. Most mind mapping programs easily support this. You can convert topics into tasks and capture start and end dates, priority, milestones and resources (people assigned to the task).

In addition, the project manager can filter the mind map to show only tasks assigned to a specific team member, one at a time. This can help team members better understand what they’re responsible for, and can be useful for resource leveling – making sure tasks are distributed equitably among the team members.

9. Project budgeting

One of the results of more complete WBS design is more accurate budgeting. By brainstorming the project scope in a mind mapping tool, the project manager can easily assign budget and duration estimates to each task. Budget and duration estimates can then be exported into Excel or Project for additional planning and analysis.

10. Streamlined reporting

Five mind mapping programs include integrated GANTT charts. This capability makes it easy to translate tasks from the WBS into a GANTT format. In addition, project data can be exported to a variety of formats, including Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Project. This makes it easy to share information with project stakeholders in formats they’re most comfortable with. This eliminates the need to manually re-enter project data in other programs.

11. Identify tasks falling behind schedule

The visual nature of a mind map makes it an ideal tool for at-a-glance monitoring of project progress. The paper recommends a simple color-coding system to make it easy to visually skim the WBS to assess what’s on target, what’s at risk, late and completed:

“The work breakdown structure can… be color coded to represent sub-deliverable (task) status. Assigning colors of red for late, yellow for at risk, green for on-target, and blue for completed deliverables is an effective way to produce a heat-map of project progress and draw management’s attention to key areas of the work breakdown structure.”

I think this is an excellent suggestion! In addition, several mind mapping programs can do conditional formatting. In other words, if a task hasn’t been completed by its due date, it will automatically be formatted in a different color, making it stand out visually.

12. Support for remote collaboration

As teams become more geographically dispersed, mind maps are emerging as an effective tool to enable collaboration with remote team members – during the project planning process and during project execution.

Project planning: A web-based mind mapping tool like MindMeister enables multiple people to simultaneously add to and edit a shared WBS mind map stored in the cloud. Several others link web-based versions of their programs with their desktop software to accomplish the same type of real-time collaboration on mind maps. Chat features enable team members to talk with one another as they contribute to the shared map, enhancing team members’ understanding of its contents.

Project execution: Several developers now offer web- and mobile-based team task management tools, which are integrated with their mind mapping software. This means that even team members who don’t have mind mapping software installed on their computers can view and contribute to project status updates.

Want to learn a simple process to create a work breakdown structure (WBS)? Check out my new online course, How to Use Mind Mapping Software for Project Management – praised by professional project managers and entrepreneurs for its effectiveness!

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MeisterTask: Web-based collaborative task management done right http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/meistertask-social-task-management-review/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/meistertask-social-task-management-review/#respond Tue, 18 Aug 2015 03:08:30 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8420 MeisterTask is a new web-based, collaborative task management tool that integrates seamlessly with the popular MindMeister mind mapping application to enable you to turn your ideas into action. In this product review, we'll take a closer look at how MeisterTask works, and how it can be useful for small project teams.

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MeisterTask - social task management

MeisterTask is a new web-based, collaborative task management tool that integrates seamlessly with the popular MindMeister mind mapping application to enable you to turn your ideas into action. This colorful, lightweight tool is perfect for small teams to streamline their project communication and get projects done faster.

In this product review, we’ll take a closer look at how MeisterTask works, and how it can be useful for small project teams.

Managing tasks starts in MindMeister

MindMeister task export to MeisterTaskMindMeister, the popular web-based mind mapping software application, enables you to add task information to any topic, including start and end dates, percentage complete, priority and the person on your team to whom the task is assigned.

To move these tasks to MeisterTask, you simple click on a checkmark icon in the footer of the workspace. A window slides into view and asks you if you want to assign the tasks to an existing project or a new one, and displays icons for the collaborators working with you on that board. A pop-up enables you to select the category to which you want to assign each task. If you select new project, MindMeister displays three options: Open, Next and In Progress. If you connect to an existing task board, it will display all of the columns that board contains.

MindMeister automatically creates icons for you and each of your team members within this gray bar, showing the number of tasks assigned to each person. As you create new tasks in MindMeister (or if you have some that you haven’t assigned to anyone yet), you can simply drag and drop them to the appropriate person’s icon.

Currently, you must manually switch between browser tabs containing MindMeister and MeisterTask. But the developer promises a future update will enable you to switch more quickly between the two applications.

Exploring the main screen of MeisterTask

MeisterTask collaborative task managementWhen you open MeisterTask, you’re greeted with a clean, columnar layout. The tasks I created in MindMeister are arranged in a list in the left column, entitled “open.” All of the notes, attachments and task information I have added to my mind map topics are here, contained within each task. Other columns are marked “next” and “in progress,” and there is room for me to add own columns to customize MeisterTask to my workflow. For now, I’m just going to create a new column called “done,” so I can see what’s been completed.

Each task is displayed as a small, horizontal card. To the right of the task name, the person to whom the task is assigned is displayed in a round circle. This makes it easy to visually skim your task dashboard to see who “owns” which task. In the lower left corner of each card, a conversation balloon with a number next to it tells you how many comments a task has received. On the date that a task is due, the card for it changes from a white background to a pale orange, which does a good job of drawing attention to it.

Across the top of the workspace are a handful of buttons and tools that control global functions within MeisterTask. For example, a drop-down list lets you easily switch between task boards. This is great thinking on the part of the developer; many users will want to maintain several task lists to help them manage their different life roles; this tool makes it easy to quickly switch between them.

An information button (a small i inside of a circle) gives you access to a tabbed dialog box where you can adjust your task board’s global settings, including:

  • Overview, which lets you change its name, add a description and an image to it and share its link with others.
  • Features, which lets you turn on and off time tracking and task relationships, plus integrates this project board with ZenDesk, GitHub and Slack (other project- and task-management tools)
  • Members, which lets you manage who is collaborating with you on your active board
  • Checklists, which lets you create pre-defined checklists that you can use with tasks in this board – ideal if you have a simple procedure for certain types of tasks that you want to follow the same way every time.
  • Time tracking, which enables you to maintain and edit timesheets for each member to track their time spent on tasks in this project board

MeisterTask - activity panelButtons in the upper right corner of the workspace give me access to several valuable filtered views of my project:

  • My tasks (by default, MeisterTask displays all of your team’s tasks)
  • Those which you have designated as my “focus” tasks. This looks like the functional equivalent of “A-level” tasks – the most important ones to which you must pay attention.

A sliding vertical panel on the right side of the workspace enables you to manage who is collaborating in this workspace and to invite others (via e-mail) to join the board. Toggling this panel open displays a chronological “activity list,” which gives you a detailed view of who did what to which tasks, when. This list is searchable, so you can zero in on specific events in the project’s history – nice!

This detailed description of MeisterTask’s interface may give you the impression it’s busy and confusing, because it does so much. But it’s not. The layout of this main screen is clean and uncluttered, unlike some collaborative task management applications I’ve seen. It’s a masterpiece of efficiency.

An intuitive way to organize tasks

Assigning tasks to each column is a simple matter of dragging and dropping them to the appropriate column. Tasks can be reordered by dragging and dropping them within a column, too. Arranging tasks in this way feels very simple and intuitive, and provides a useful context for each of your tasks. You can group them by priority or create columns for specific locations or regarding specific people.

So, for example, you can create a column entitled “home” to store your reminders of errands and tasks that involve your family, or another column with your boss’ name, to help you gather a list of issues and follow-ups you must discuss with him or her. I love the flexibility of MeisterTask’s interface, because I can configure it to match the way I work.

Adding tasks and details to them

MeisterTask task detailYou can easily add a task to any column by clicking on the plus sign at the bottom of it. Clicking on a task within MeisterTask opens a dialog box that gives you more options for adding details to it. You can:

  • Create a checklist
  • Add an attachment
  • Add a comment
  • Read the string of comments related to that task
  • Complete the task

I particularly like the checklist, which essentially lets you create sub-tasks within the larger task. What’s also cool is when you click on attachments, a small window pops up that lets you attach files not only from your local computer, but also Dropbox, Google Drive and MindMeister. Clearly, the developer is making the most of the fact that MindMeister is a web-based application by enabling it to connect with other popular online file repositories!

You can also view the history of the task – where it started life and how it has been modified during its “lifetime” and by whom. This could be quite useful to better understand how a task got to where it’s at today.

Tags make it possible to group and filter tasks in MeisterTask in meaningful ways. MeisterTask enables you to create as many tags as you need, assign colors to them (which appear as a small, colored dot) and re-use them throughout your task board. A star icon enables you to add a task to a short list of “focus tasks.”

Finally, a large, prominently-placed “complete this task” button at the top of the dialog box encourages you to get things done. When you complete a task, it gets a large, satisfying checkmark next to it in the columnar task view, and the text of the task has a line through it – both are comfortable analogues for the ways in which we designate tasks as completed on hand-written to-do lists.

All of this detailed task data is presented in a clear, well-designed format that is easy to follow and doesn’t overwhelm.

Enabling social task management

No man is an island. Neither is a knowledge worker today. We must all get things done for or with others. MeisterTask makes it easy to assign tasks to others on your team and to hold real-time discussions with them. A button playfully entitled “say it” encourages interaction and keeps the experience of working with MeisterTask fun. This chat icon changes color when new messages have been added, giving me an immediate visual clue that there is something to which you need to pay attention.

Mobile integration

MeisterTask for iOSMeister Labs has launched mobile versions of MeisterTask for Apple iOS (iPhone and iPad) as well as the Android mobile operating system. I downloaded MeisterTask to my iPhone and was pleased to see how well MeisterTask’s list-based content translates to the small screen. Like its big brother, this app displays tasks as cards on screen; swiping right and left enables me to move between me open, next, in progress and other columns of tasks.

You can also view a list of activities, invite and manage users and edit the global properties of your projects. A prominent blue button at the bottom of the screen makes it easy to add tasks. Like the browser version of MeisterTask, the mobile version is efficient and well-designed. Clearly, Meister Labs has one or more very talented user interface designers on its staff, because it shows in the intuitive layout and functionality of both the mobile and browser-based versions of MeisterTask.

How can you get MeisterTask?

MeisterTask is a free service for anyone with an existing MindMeister account. If you don’t have one, you can get a personal account for only US$5 per month; Pro and Business levels are also available, which add more functionality to MindMeister and enable team collaboration features. But MeisterTask works perfectly well with a personal account.

Conclusion

When it comes to task management applications, I’m notoriously picky. I’ve always had a hard time finding one that can adapt to my workflow. Based on the time I’ve spent learning how to use MeisterTask, I’m very pleased with what I’ve seen so far. I especially like the browser/mobile app integration, which makes it easy for me to add tasks when I’m on the run, but still access a full list of my to-dos when I’m back in front of my laptop.

For avid users of MindMeister, MeisterTask fills an important need. If you have developed a detailed plan for a project in MindMeister, what’s the next step? How do you implement your idead? MeisterTask is the answer.

As far as I’m concerned, MeisterTask is a winner!

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Creativity: How to connect the dots – visually! http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/creativity-how-to-connect-ideas-visually/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/creativity-how-to-connect-ideas-visually/#respond Fri, 07 Aug 2015 12:36:32 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8405 In today's world of accelerating innovation, new ideas are more valuable than ever. Most ideas don't come from bolts out of the blue but by connecting previously unrelated bits of information together in creative ways - "connecting the dots," so to speak. That plays to several of the strengths of mind mapping software, making it an excellent creativity tool.

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how to connect the dots - visually

In today’s world of accelerating innovation, new ideas are more valuable than ever. Most ideas don’t come from bolts out of the blue but by connecting previously unrelated bits of information together in creative ways – “connecting the dots,” so to speak. That plays to several of the strengths of mind mapping software, making it an excellent creativity tool.

The radial visual structure of a mind map makes it easy to see relationships and connections between disparate bits of information. In addition, because a mind map structures information the way your brain does – by association – you’re likely to capture more of your brain’s output in a mind map. That, in turn, increases the odds that you’ll be able to form novel combinations between the bits of information you’ve captured in your mind map – more dots to connect.

In other words, mind maps significantly enhance your ability to uncover creative breakthroughs.

There are 3 key ways mind mapping software helps you to connect ideas: 

1. Moving or “refactoring” topics: Refactoring is the process of moving topics from one part of your map to another and, in so doing, re-evaluating and reconsidering the relationship between that parent topic and its new sibling. Moving a topic to a new home changes its context. Coincidentally, it also places it in close proximity to a new constellation of topics, which can reveal patterns that weren’t previously visible. In this way, you can play “what if” with your ideas. Rearrange several topics. If their new positions give you fresh insights or ideas, that’s awesome! If not, use your program’s undo command to return them to their former locations.

2. Using relationship lines: Relationship lines are used to connect topics without moving them. In doing so, you are creating a bond between them. In that sense, it’s a simple way of connecting a handful of dots in your mind maps. I don’t recommend this technique if you want to show a lot of relationships because your mind map will quickly become visually cluttered.

3. By visually classifying related information by topic style and color or symbols and icons.  For example, you could ask yourself, “Which of these topics is related to X?” and then color all of those topics blue. That would  immediately creates a visual connection between them each time you view your mind map. If you add an icon to the topics you want to connect, you can actually filter the contents of your map based on it.

Bonus: Once you have grouped related ideas together on a single branch, some programs enable you to “break them off” of the main map – to convert them into a linked sub-map. This is a very effective way to isolate them so you can embellish and expand upon them, free of distractions.

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12 reasons you need to get off the fence and use mind mapping software for project management http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/12-reasons-project-management-mind-mapping-software/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/12-reasons-project-management-mind-mapping-software/#respond Thu, 30 Jul 2015 16:54:35 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8382 As the speed of business continues to increase and projects become more complex, project managers need better tools to help them plan, implement, monitor project status and communicate effectively with team members and stakeholders. Here are 12 ways mind mapping software can help you step up to the plate and meet these growing challenges.

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project management and mind mapping software

As the speed of business continues to increase and projects become more complex, project managers need better tools to help them plan, implement, monitor project status and communicate effectively with team members and stakeholders – who are often geographically dispersed. Mind mapping software has emerged as a powerful tool that is particularly well-suited to project management.

“Today’s project managers have more to manage than just project scope, deliverables, communications and teams. They are also expected to manage large volumes of project-related data and to help team members and stakeholders work through project issues, risks and problems,” explains Paul Williams, author of the new book, Visual Project Management. “They need to be able to create visualizations that allow stakeholders to fully digest all that data in ways that are quick, effective and clear. These new expectations require new skills.”

Here are 12 ways in which mind mapping software can help you step up your project management game:

Project planning

1. Mind mapping software can help you and your team team do a better job of defining the problem the project is being created to solve.

2. It can help you make more efficient and effective decisions on where to invest money and resources.

3. At the beginning of a project, mind mapping software enables you to brainstorm and organize all of the key information you and your team need about its scope, time, cost, quality, resources, communications, risks and stakeholder requirements.

4. It can help you clarify your thinking on what the project brief is all about, to find gaps in your knowledge and also in the information provided to you, note any points that may require clarification and set follow-ups to contact colleagues for the additional pieces of information they need.

5. Mind mapping software can help you tame a mountain of project information. It enables you to expand and collapse map branches and filter their contents, so you can zero in on the key bits of information that are most important to you at any given moment.

6. You can keep all of your research materials, notes, links and other documents well-organized as links in your project planning mind map. This keeps them one click away, and can save you hours of searching for them.

Project implementation

7. Mind mapping software that is equipped with project management tools enables you to manage the implementation of the project, acting as a concise, at-a-glance dashboard and project reference.

8. It’s the only type of business productivity software that enables you to see the forest AND the trees. In other words, you can view a project mind map at a high level, and also drill down into specific details such as task start and end dates, resources assigned to them and task dependencies.

Project communication

9. A software-produced mind map foster a common language for conversations and discussions among the members of your project team. If team members have a shared vision of what needs to be done and why, they can implement faster, with fewer misunderstandings and less miscommunication.

10. It can help you streamline briefings for new team members. They can instantly see how all of the data points on the map interrelate, including the relative importance of each element and how it impacts the overall project.

11. For those project stakeholders who are comfortable with mind maps, they provide project status data in a concise, easily understandable format.

12. For those stakeholders who are not comfortable with mind maps, you can easily export project data to other popular formats, such as Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Excel and Project.

It’s time to get off the fence

Project management with mind mapping softwareAs you can see, the benefits of managing your projects with mind mapping software far outweigh the small learning curve you’ll need to go through to get proficient at it.

  • Clarity.
  • Better decisions.
  • Improved collaboration.
  • Fewer delays and misunderstandings.
  • Less scope creep.
  • Happier stakeholders.

What business person doesn’t want these things?

Best of all, I can help you get started – fast.

Click here to learn about my new online course that will teach you everything you need to know to jump off the fence and get a running start on this important set of skills!

project management with mind mapping software e-course

Flickr image by Freddie Peña 

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How to streamline project management with mind mapping software http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/project-management-ecourse-launched/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/project-management-ecourse-launched/#respond Thu, 23 Jul 2015 21:35:01 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8353 Project management is one of its most practical and powerful applications, but it’s also one of the least understood. That’s why I created a new online course that's focused on how to use mind mapping software for project management. It's available now!

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Project management with mind mapping software

Do you face any of these common challenges when managing projects?

  • Managing their scope
  • Brainstorming ideas to make them successful
  • Accurately assessing risks
  • Organizing the huge volume of project data
  • Forgetting to include important details
  • Failure to take into account a specific stakeholder’s needs
  • Poor project communication and collaboration

One type of productivity tool can help solve these challenges: Mind mapping software.

Project management is one of its most practical and powerful applications, but it’s also one of the least understood. That’s why I created a new online course that’s focused on how to use mind mapping software for project management.

how to use mind mapping software for project management

What will you learn from my new e-course?

Project management with mind mapping softwareThis valuable new learning resource provides you with a comprehensive plain-English overview of the project and task management capabilities of today’s mind mapping software. It gathers a wealth of best practices and key insights into a single e-learning program.

In short, it will arm you with the knowledge you need to start visually managing your projects today.

This comprehensive e-course covers:

  • Why existing methods of project management aren’t as effective today
  • The benefits of using mind mapping software for project management
  • Which programs support project management functionality?
  • A glossary of relevant project management terms
  • A simple 9-step process for planning your projects – visually
  • Tips on how to be most effective when managing your projects with a mind map
  • The best resources on mind mapping software and project management, where you can continue to learn on your own

Best of all, it’s delivered online, which means you can view the course materials whenever and wherever it’s most convenient for you. Here is an excerpt of the course video, which explains the thinking behind this new course:

And, by the way, this e-course isn’t focused on one specific software program. The principles and tactics you’ll learn can be used with any mind mapping program that does project management (there are 5 of them).

Bonus resources

Project management with mind mapping softwareIn addition to the e-course, this learning package includes several other valuable resources that can help you find the right mind mapping program to help you manage your projects:

  • Video reviews of 5 mind mapping programs that handle project management. These 8-minute videos provide you with “deeper dives” into the specific capabilities and usability of each program. I share their pros AND cons with you – no holds barred!
  • A new product comparison chart that enables you to compare these 5 programs on over 70 task- and project-management features and capabilities. It’s an ideal tool to help you find the program that best matches your needs!

Who is this e-course for?

This new project management e-course is focused on project management for the rest of us – business people who have tasks and projects they must manage – but who haven’t had formal training in project management.

This course is for any executive or entrepreneur who is seeking a better approach to designing, implementing and measuring the performance of projects. If your work involves managing small- to medium-sized projects, then this e-course is for you!

how to use mind mapping software for project management

What will this e-course enable you to do?

Managing projects doesn’t have to be a nightmare from hell. With proper planning and management, which I will teach you, you will be able to:

  • Analyze, organize and make sense of a mountain of project information faster
  • Use it to create more comprehensive, complete and well-thought out project plans
  • Manage projects with greater confidence and less frustration
  • Become an agile project manager – able to adapt  to changes quickly and get projects done efficiently
  • Organize the mountain of project information so you can access and update it quickly and easily
  • Impress your boss and other stakeholders with your ability to deliver successfully-completed projects – on time and on budget
  • Improve the productivity and efficiency of your project team
  • Enhance your reputation as a can-do manager in your organization

What’s my return on investment (ROI)?

ROI - project management e-courseIf you are able to manage even one medium-sized project more efficiently, with fewer delays and cost overruns, this e-course will pay for itself many times over. Both in terms of tangible income (your next raise at work) and intangible benefits (you’ll look good in the eyes of your boss and other key stakeholders), this e-course is a bargain!

Don’t believe me? Here are some conservative numbers that prove it:

Assumptions

  • An hourly rate of $50 (very conservative – most mid- to senior-level executives are worth at least $70 an hour).
  • A project team of 4 people (that’s on the small side – many teams are larger).
  • A project lifecycle (from planning to completion) of 6 months (24 weeks)

ROI over the life of a small team project

  • Hours saved in project planning process: 5 x 4 people = 20
  • Hours saved by more efficient collaboration: 1 hour/week x 4 people x 24 weeks = 96
  • Hours of rework avoided (because all stakeholder expectations were met): 10
  • Hours saved in finding key information: 2 hours/week – or 48 hours

Total time saved: 174 hours x $50/hour = $8,700 – a 217:1 return on investment!

ROI over the life of a personal project

Even on a personal project, the ROI is very compelling:

  • Hours saved in project planning: 5
  • Hours of rework saved: 5
  • Hours saved finding key information: 1 hour/week = 24

Total time saved: 34 x $50/hour = $1,700 – a 42:1 ROI.

Now’s the time to enhance your skills

Now is the time to enhance your project planning and management skills with mind mapping software. Planning your projects visually will help you organize the mountain of project data, avoid scope creep and to formulate project plans that are more complete and less likely to get derailed by collaboration and stakeholder problems.

You’ll be armed with a visual dashboard that will help you manage project implementation and progress reporting faster and more clearly.

Best of all, your boss will be pleased by your comprehensive, visual approach to planning and managing your projects, which will come in on time and on budget more often.

project management with mind mapping software

My ironclad guarantee

If you are dissatisfied with this e-course for any reason whatsoever within 30 days, I will give you a full refund of your investment in it. No questions asked. In other words, You have nothing to lose and much to gain!




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Visual project management: From mind map to GANTT chart http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/project-management-mind-map-to-gantt-chart/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/project-management-mind-map-to-gantt-chart/#respond Tue, 14 Jul 2015 20:58:16 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8339 To help you better understand the relationship between mind mapping software and project management, I have created an infographic that helps you understand how task data gets mapped over to a visual timeline.

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Visual project management - from mind map to GANTT chart

One of the reasons mind mapping software is such a popular tool for project management is that the data you can capture in topic tasks maps very neatly over to a GANTT project timeline view.

This gives you two visual perspectives on your tasks, their sequence and dependencies, and when each one needs to be completed. If you’re having trouble picturing how the information from your mind map translates into a GANTT chart, I’ve created an infographic that explains it all – visually, of course!

To download it, please click on the button below:

 

project management with mind mapping software e-course

 

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9 mind maps for exceptional project management http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/9-mind-maps-for-exceptional-project-management/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/9-mind-maps-for-exceptional-project-management/#respond Fri, 10 Jul 2015 17:18:28 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8330 Mind mapping software can be used in a myriad of ways to streamline project management. It's not only valuable for project planning, but also execution and analysis. In his new book, Mind Maps for Effective Project Management, Maneesh Dutt outlines 9 types of mind maps that can help you streamline your project management processes and increase your odds of success.

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9 mind maps for project management

Mind mapping software can be used in a myriad of ways to streamline project management. It’s not only valuable for project planning, but also execution and analysis.

In his new book, Mind Maps for Effective Project Management, professional project manager and trainer Maneesh Dutt presents the idea that today’s project environment requires different tools and a different way of thinking.

“Project management is both an art and a science, requiring both our left and right brain skills,” Dutt explains. “However, the multitude of tools for PM that we find in the market seem to focus strongly on the logic, measurements and have in effect a left brain dominance. Mind maps are the perfect approach to fill in this missing gap and take project management to its next level of maturity where it becomes more engaging and fun, resulting in more successful projects.”

In the book, he outlines 9 types of mind maps that project managers can create to do build a more complete picture of stakeholder needs, project requirements, execution steps and much more. He does so with a high degree of clarity, making his insights especially valuable to those of us who would like to do a more effective job of managing our increasingly complex and multifaceted projects.

Feasibility study

Often, before project managers begin mapping requirements, resources, costs, risks another other factors, they first conduct an analysis to determine if a project is feasible. The project feasibility map considers:

  • Customer expectations
  • Customer requirements
  • Time
  • Cost
  • Quality

“A good feasibility study ends with adequate clarity and confidence on achieving the project goals. Otherwise, (the) management must take a ‘NO GO’ decision until further clarity (is reached) or the project is finally shelved,” Dutt explains

Project benefit analysis

The purpose of the project benefit analysis mind map is to check the potential positive or negative effects of the project on stakeholders, and to ensure that no stakeholder groups have been overlooked during the project planning process. To create such a mind map, create first-level topics for each major stakeholder group. It should explore:

  • Pros and cons for customers (technical, price and functional benefits and potential downsides)
  • End-user benefits/disadvantages (if different than the direct customer)
  • Competitive implications (technical, cost and time to market)
  • Your organization’s management (revenues, profits and strategic and tactical outcomes)
  • The project team (skills they will develop and opportunities that may be revealed as a result of this project)
  • Other pros and cons (such as social, political, environmental, health and safety implications of your proposed project)

One powerful use of this mind map, according to Dutt, is “to motivate the project team by instilling a stronger sense of purpose, once they see the wide impact of their project.” Indeed, once it’s mapped out visually, it becomes abundantly clear that any project has implications well beyond the immediate and most visible group of stakeholders.

Project charter

project charter mind map“The project charter formally authorizes the existence of a project and provides the project manager with the authority to apply organizational resources to project activities,” Dutt explains. Its purpose is to clearly define the top-level boundaries in enough detail that your organization’s management can make an informed decision on committing resources to your project.

A typical project charter mind map may include:

  • A project overview (project manager, team, authority and resources)
  • Project requirements (summarized at a high level). Dutt points out that this map branch could be similar to the content of the requirements branch in the project feasibility map
  • The project’s objective
  • Milestones that will be used to determine if the project is on track
  • Assumptions (key elements in assessing the risks the project will entail)
  • Constraints (the big three: time, budget and quality, plus any other constraints that are relevant to the project under consideration)
  • Risks
  • Stakeholder groups (internal and external)

At first glance, the project charter and the project feasibility mind maps may contain similar information, but Dutt points out that the purpose of each one is significantly different:

“The feasibility mind map is more investigative and helps decide whether the project needs to be executed in the first place or not. The project charter… captures the facts and assumptions to enable the management to commit resources to the project.”

Collecting and prioritizing requirements

Once the project charter has been approved by your organization’s management team, the process of collecting and prioritizing the project’s requirements begins in earnest. Often, Dutt cautions, customers are unclear about the priority of their requirements; the project manager must assist them with this process.

One effective way of doing this is the Kano model, which identifies project requirements in terms of their impact on the end customer. This leads to three high-level categories of requirements, which can easily be captured in a mind map:

  • Must-have or basic requirements (if these are missing, the end result of the project will be unsatisfactory to the customer)
  • Performance or linear factors (these factors are those that, when improved, cause a linear increase in the level of customer satisfaction)
  • Excitement factors (these factors cause customer delight compared to the basic project requirements, even if they have little or no impact on him or her)

Dutt concludes that the project requirements mind map gives the team a clear picture of the requirements they need to focus upon as the project progresses.

Scope definition

Once the project requirements have been mapped and finalized, it’s time for the project team to prepare a scope of work. This mind map outlines the processes and set of activities needed for the project to be completed successfully. To define a project scope, you must first identify the following elements:

  • Project objectives
  • Goals
  • Sub-phases
  • Tasks
  • Resources
  • Budget
  • Schedule

Once you’ve done so, you’ll need to clarify the limitations or parameters of the project and clearly identify any aspects that are not to be included. Identifying what is NOT within the scope of the project now can help the project team avoid problems later.

“Having an approved project scope early in the project helps reduce the changes and iteration as the project progresses,” Dutt cautions. This is the dreaded “scope creep” that dooms many projects to costly delays and significant budget overruns.

Work breakdown structure

The project scope mind map leads to the development of a work breakdown structure (WBS), which lists the phases of the project and everything it must deliver at each step. In other words, the WBS is a framework for dividing work into definable increments from which the statement of work can be developed and technical, schedule, cost, and labor hour reporting can be established.

The tree structure of the WBS visually depicts the subdivision of effort and deliverables required to successfully complete each phase of the project. In that sense, it is a project control map. One of the biggest functions of the work breakdown structure is to ensure that key tasks are not overlooked – especially important considering the complexity of today’s projects, the number of internal stakeholders who are typically involved and the number of inputs and resources needed to keep a large project moving efficiently.

Project time management

In the book, Dutt outlines project time management as another important aspect of project success that can benefit from a visual thinking approach. This mind map should define each of the project’s milestones as first-level topics, and important parameters of each project phase can be arranged as subtopics. Lower-level topics can be used to record estimated effort and cost versus actual values.

Project cost management

This mind map includes processes that are necessary to ensure that the project is completed within the approved budget. A mind map is an ideal format for capturing both major cost centers and estimates for individual elements within them. Major areas of cost that should be captured in your project cost management mind map include:

  • Employee costs
  • Subcontractors
  • Equipment costs
  • Facilities costs
  • Consumables
  • Training
  • Travel

Dutt points out that not only is the project cost management a very effective front-end planning tool, but it can also be used to track estimated versus actual costs as the project progresses.

Project team skill assessment

project team skills assessmentBecause each project and the team assembled to execute it varies from one project to the next, the project manager must pay careful attention to the strengths and weaknesses of each person on the project team – especially those areas where skill building is required in order for the project to be completed successfully.

“Spending a little time to assess the skills necessary for the project versus available can really help find skill gaps, if any, and so allow for better roles and responsibilities definition,” Dutt shares. This needs to be done early enough in the project initiation phase that he or she has time to plan for and fill any missing skills in time to deliver a successful project.

Dutt recommends listing the soft and hard skills required for successful execution of the project on the right side of the mind map. The left side of the mind map can be used to detail the skills of the team that can be applied to the project. This visual approach makes any gaps very visible, and makes it easier to spot weaknesses that need to be strengthened.

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Visual project management comes of age: An interview with Paul Williams http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/visual-project-management-paul-williams/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/visual-project-management-paul-williams/#respond Mon, 15 Jun 2015 18:19:16 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8286 In recent years, visual project management has emerged as a set of tools and techniques that help project managers to make sense of and manage large, complex projects more effectively. Paul R. Williams, PMP has written a new book entitled Visual Project Management that can help us better understand what they are and when and where to employ them when managing projects. I recently interviewed him to learn more about these tools, techniques and visual frameworks, and why they work so well.

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In recent years, visual project management has emerged as a set of tools and techniques that help project managers to make sense of and manage large, complex projects more effectively. Paul R. Williams, PMP has written a new book entitled Visual Project Management that can help us better understand what they are and when and where to employ them when managing projects. I recently interviewed him to learn more about these tools, techniques and visual frameworks, and why they work so well.

Chuck Frey: Why is visual project management so important today? What problems does it solve?

Visual Project ManagementPaul Williams: As the speed of business continues to increase, and as focus on an ever growing number of data points is needed to keep business and project execution under control, new and innovative tools and techniques are required to help busy executives make efficient and effective decisions on where to invest money and resources. Visualization of data and complex processes has proven exceptionally valuable in meeting those needs.

Visual Project Management is essentially a new practice concept that integrates visual thinking tools and data visualization methodologies with more traditional project communication, reporting and facilitation practices. It leverages the latest techniques in presenting data and information within visually-rich models that make it easier for project teams to understand of critical project information data points and key performance metrics.

The visual project management approach serves as an additional tool for project management professionals to provide:

  • At-a-glance views of project status
  • Real-time project status tracking
  • Real-time issue management and resolution status
  • Data rich environments for better decision making

Finally, the use of visual thinking tools enhances understanding of complex projects and supports management of high volumes of data. Visual thinking tools also enable conceptual and idea-development processes, as well as fostering a common language for conversations and discussions among the members of the project team.

Frey: What do agile-based methods of managing projects have to do with the move toward visual project management methodologies?

Williams: Agile approaches to managing projects have started to become popular within even the most conservative industries like financial services, insurance and healthcare. Self-managed teams are beginning to replace hierarchical management structures. Time-boxed iterations, or “sprints” of work, rather than start-to-finish individual task sequencing, has allowed for increased velocity in completing deliverables or objectives.

As agile continues to grow in use and impact, more and more project professionals and business sponsors are being exposed the visual work management tools used in the agile world such as Kanban boards, Scrum boards, burndown charts and other tools taken from the old Lean and SixSigma playbooks. Visual-based status tracking and feedback displays prompt the question of what other work management, project management or even portfolio management communications can be made more visual for quicker, easier comprehension.

The challenge now is to get project teams and business stakeholders to understand that there is more to the world of visual thinking and data visualization than the limited set of tools and techniques used in the Lean and Agile communities. Education and reference tools such as Visual Project Management are the first step in that process.

Frey: You mention in the book that traditional project meetings often devolved into confusion and frustration, because teams lacked a way to make sense of all of the data and complexity they were forced to deal with. How do visual project management tools bring clarity to the table?

Williams: Here’s a simple, scientific fact: 60-65% of the general population are comfortable with visual thinking. When two-thirds of the people sitting in your project status meeting, scope planning meeting or work breakdown session are subjected to verbose, text-based status reports, linear GANTT charts, indented outline templates and spreadsheets full of complex data, confusion and frustration will eventually prevail.

Project teams and stakeholders who can comprehend project status at a glance using a dashboard, visualize pertinent project performance metric trending on a control limited earned value diagram, or can make quick sense of complex resource supply/demand data sets using a stacked bar chart, on the other hand, will experience clarity, efficiency and greater understanding and retention of the data. In the end, this leads to more informative and faster decision making.

Frey: You mention in the book that project management has evolved from a “push” model, where the project manager decides the who, what, when, where and why of the project, to a more collaborative “pull-based” form of project communication. What’s driving this change, and how do visual-based project management methods support and enable it?

Williams: In today’s time-compressed and lean business culture, busy executive sponsors and key project stakeholders simply do not have the luxury of time to digest a verbose, three page project status report on a weekly basis. Likewise, their double-booked calendars can no longer support attending status briefing meetings that simply regurgitate information that is otherwise available in alternative formats.

Visual project management offers up information in ways that anyone can consume it at a time, place and manner that is convenient to them. More and more information is being made available electronically, meant to be digested when the recipient has the time to review it. In this “pull-based” form of communication, information is simply posted to a common location, similar to a bulletin board or document library. The recipient chooses what information they want to receive and when they want to access it.

Most importantly, it creates an opportunity for the project manager and the project stakeholders to have a conversation about what information and specific data points are most important to them. Then, leveraging any number of visual thinking tools, the project manager can design the format that most clearly and efficiently serves their needs.

Frey: It’s been my observation that one of the aspects of project management that has been missing from dedicated project management tools like Microsoft Project has been the front-end work – the design and scoping of the project. How do visual tools help teams do a better job of planning projects?

Williams: I completely agree and I’d even extend it farther back in the process to concept development, problem solving and business analysis. Visual thinking tools like mind mapping, process mapping, simple drawings /sketching and storyboarding are perfect techniques to work through creative concept development and scoping sessions. Classic root cause analysis tools like the fishbone diagram, 5 whys and failure mode analysis charting are a big help in defining the problem the project is being created to solve. Finally, as the scope and design parameters of the project start coming together, visual business analysis tools such as wireframing, use cases, screen flow diagrams and system integration maps make the work much easier to understand.

When it comes to breaking down and planning out the work, a mind map is probably the best tool available for that kind of task, while graphics like swimlane diagrams are perfect for depicting cross-functional/cross-team hand-offs. Resource loading charts that display available supply/demand information make assigning out work to resources much easier. Unfortunately, you won’t find all of these tools in one suite of software, which makes it more challenging to gain adoption.

Frey: What are the advantages of using mind mapping software for project management?

visual project managementWilliams: Using mind mapping for project management makes absolute logical sense. Project managers need to organize large amounts of project-related data points and ordered lists. While they are all related to the overall management of a particular project, they are not all structured, classified or utilized in the same way. Mind mapping software is a natural fit for organizing blue-sky thinking, developing creative solutions to the problems being solved by the project and breaking from traditional, linear thinking patterns.

Because mind maps lend themselves so easily to organizing different categories of data and information quickly, orderly and visually, they have become an incredibly popular tool among project management professionals. It also has other benefits: It is an ideal framework for documenting work breakdown structures, documenting in-scope and out-of-scope items, and organizing project resources, roles and responsibilities, keeping project notes in a centralized location, listing key project milestones, deliverables or other goals set by the project stakeholders, and serving as an “parking lot” for keeping meeting agenda topics, change requests, scope clarifications and other discussion points for future use or reference.

Frey: You list many other visual project management methods in the book. What are a few of your favorites, and what makes them stand out in your mind?

Wiliams: Like you, I’ve been using mind maps since before there was mind mapping software, so it continues to be my “go-to” tool for anything that has an organizational or categorization spin to it. The dashboarding concept has been around for some time in executive management circles, but there’s so much more we can do from a project management perspective with respect to communicating more efficiently and reducing the comprehension curve. I think dashboards are also ripe for advances in automation as well to take some of the design and preparation burden off of the project manager. I’ve also been dabbling in the world of infographic design and telling a project story using infographic vectors and data sets. But the simplest and most used tool remains the simple graphing and charting options available in software like Microsoft Excel or iWork Numbers.

Frey: Where do you think visual project management methods are headed from here? What will they look like 5 years from now?

Williams: I see more and more project-based planning, monitoring and reporting moving away from traditional software models and becoming much more app-based. I see a future where project managers and business executives alike can visualize project information, status and key performance data, in real-time on a tablet or phone or watch or other media device we haven’t anticipated yet.

My biggest hope is that Visual Project Management will stir some new interest, creative thinking and alternative approaches to this new practice area among younger project professionals, software/app developers and data modelers. Ideally, I’d love to see them push the concept forward and bring useful new graphical tools and displays to the market, not unlike how infographics and wikis and task boards have changed our world over the past five years. As I mentioned earlier, there still isn’t a comprehensive visual project management software package available where all of these visual tools and techniques exist under one umbrella. I hope we see that change in the future!

I also envision entirely new combinations with other business and work management tools and techniques that we haven’t yet seen or thought to integrate so far. This would be similar to the new concepts we’ve seen from recent collisions of Lean, Agile, SixSigma and innovation management methodologies with both traditional and new project, portfolio and operations management approaches.

Frey: Is there anything else you think the readers of my blog should know about visual project management tools and techniques?

Williams: Today’s project manager has more to manage than just project scope, deliverables, communications and teams. They are also expected to manage large volumes of project-related data. And the expectation goes beyond just managing the data. It extends into creating great visualizations that allow stakeholders to fully digest all that data in ways that are quick, effective and clear. They are also expected to serve as facilitators in the use of visual thinking tools as a method for working through project issues, risks and problems. These new expectations require new skills. The era of multi-page, text-based project communication is over. The era of visual project management is here. It’s time to “skill up!”

Frey: Where can my readers learn more about Visual Project Management and purchase it?

Williams: To learn more about Visual Project Management concepts and the book, your readers can visit my website. From there, you can link directly to your favorite online bookseller (Amazon.com, B&N.com and Apple iBookstore) to obtain either a hard cover or electronic copy of the book. Alternatively, you can also obtain a deeply discounted copy directly from the publisher using the link above as well. A paperback version will be coming out late summer of 2015.

project management with mind mapping software e-course

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Bizz Draw app simplifies sketching of over 100 business concepts http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/bizz-draw-app-simplifies-sketching-of-business-concepts/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/bizz-draw-app-simplifies-sketching-of-business-concepts/#respond Fri, 05 Jun 2015 12:30:18 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8278 If you are new to sketching or sketchnoting, it's often hard to know what symbols you should draw to represent certain business ideas or concepts. Thankfully, there is now an app for that.

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Bizz Draw app for sketching

If you are new to sketching or sketchnoting, it’s often hard to know what symbols you should draw to represent certain business ideas or concepts. Thankfully, there is now an app for that.

Bizz Draw is an app for iOS and Android that consists of a library of simple shapes you can use as examples and inspiration for concepts like collaboration, expertise, conversation and process.

The developer of Bizz Draw, GRIDD Nl, is a design consultancy based in the Netherlands. It created this intriguing app to give business people greater confidence to try capturing their ideas visually.

A tour of Bizz Draw

Bizz Draw for sketchingWhen you first open Bizz Draw, it displays five large buttons that lead to these categories of images:

  • Strategy and tactics
  • Ideation and operation
  • People and teams
  • Digital and media
  • Risks and opportunities

Tapping on a button displays a list of shapes and concepts that you can utilize in your drawings. This list-based approach does a great job of illuminating what’s possible and gives you a simple visual “language” you can use in your sketches.

A sixth button gives you the ability to search a much larger library of shapes and concepts – over 100 in all.

Tapping on an individual sketch opens a page that contains an image, a brief description of when and how to use it, keywords and, in some cases, brief video tutorials. Each type of sketch contains numerous keywords, which make it easy to find using Bizz Draw’s search tool.

The use case for Bizz Draw

It’s not often that I see an app that is intended to be used as a reference tool, but Bizz Draw’s simple, elegant design makes it a very effective one. Whether you’re sketching out an idea on your own in your favorite thinking spot or facing a whiteboard in front of a room full of your colleagues, you can simply pull out your smart phone, open up Bizz Draw and, within a few seconds, find an appropriate image that you can replicate in your sketch.

What’s next?

Within the app, GRIDD invites users to suggest additional shapes and concepts that should be added to its shape library. The developer promises to periodically add the best of the suggestions to the shape library in future updates.

You can download Bizz Draw for free for both the Apple and Android platforms.

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Project management with mind mapping software e-course (coming soon!) http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/project-management-e-course-coming-soon/ http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/project-management-e-course-coming-soon/#respond Sat, 30 May 2015 13:54:01 +0000 http://mindmappingsoftwareblog.com/?p=8273 Project management is one of the most practical and powerful applications of mind mapping software, but it's also one of the least understood. That's why I'm now producing an e-course that will teach you all you need to be effective.

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project management for mind mapping software

Planning and implementing projects is one of the most important applications of mind mapping software you will ever learn about. Nearly everyone manages projects today, or has tasks for which they are responsible. But organizations often don’t give us the tools that enable us to manage projects effectively.

At the beginning of a project, mind mapping software enables you to collect and organize all of the key information you and your team need about its scope, time, cost, quality, resources, communications, risks and stakeholder requirements. It then enables you to manage the implementation of the project, acting as a dashboard to provide you with one-click access to its status.

Project management is one of the most practical and powerful applications of mind mapping software, but it’s also one of the least understood. That’s why I’m now in the process of producing an e-course that will teach you all you need to be effective.

What’s included in this new project management e-course?

Here’s what this valuable new learning resource will cover:

  • The benefits of using mind mapping software for project management
  • Which programs support project management functionality?
  • A glossary of relevant project management terms
  • A simple process for setting up and managing your projects – visually
  • Tips on how to be even more effective managing your projects using this type of software

New: The task- and project-management comparison chart

I am also producing a comparison chart that digs deep into the task- and project-management functionality of the major mind mapping programs, so you can easily see which ones meet your team’s project needs. This hasn’t been covered in much detail in my popular Mind Mapping Software Comparison Chart, so it’s about time I deliver this must-know information to you!

Be the first to know when this course is available

Register now to be notified when this training program is ready for purchase. If you do so, I’ll provide you with special pre-launch pricing on it. And, of course, I’ll notify you when I launch this course:

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